Free topographic maps, elevation, relief

Free topographic maps visualization and sharing.

St. George

Click on the map to display elevation.

St. George, Washington County, Utah, United States (37.10415 -113.58413)

About this map

Name: St. George topographic map, elevation, relief.
Coordinates: 37.00000 -113.64976 37.20959 -113.47681
Minimum elevation: 2,450 ft
Maximum elevation: 5,489 ft
Average elevation: 3,320 ft

St. George

The city has abundant sunshine year-round and averages about 300 sunny days per year, with an average 8.80 inches (224 mm) of precipitation annually. The wettest "rain year" has been from July 2004 to June 2005 with at least 15.66 inches (398 mm) (some days were missing) and the driest from July 1973 to June 1974 with 3.89 inches (98.8 mm). Record breaking wide spread flooding occurred during January 2005 when all area rivers far exceeded their banks and washed out homes and some neighborhoods. The wettest month has been January 1993, when 4.74 inches (120 mm) fell. Precipitation is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year, except for a markedly drier period in May and June, which occurs after the Pacific storm season ends, but before the southwest monsoon begins, usually in mid-July. Precipitation mostly comes from the Pacific Ocean from late fall through early spring. The storm track usually lifts north of the city by mid-April. The monsoon brings localized and often intense thunderstorms from early July through mid-September. The greatest rainfall in 24 hours was 2.40 inches (61 mm) on August 31, 1909. St. George occasionally receives a dusting of snow in the winter, but what does accumulate usually melts away by the mid-to-late morning; the normal seasonal snowfall is 1.4 inches (3.6 cm). The earliest snowfall was measured on October 29, 1971 and the latest on April 11, 1927. The record single-day snowfall is 10.0 inches (25 cm) which was set on January 5, 1974. With the city having different elevations, ranging from 2700 feet to about 3500 feet, some areas such as Diamond Valley and Winchester Hills will typically receive more snowfall and colder temperatures than the rest of the lower valley. The most recent major snowfall was on December 8, 2013 when between 6.0 and 8.0 inches (15 and 20 cm) virtually shut down the city, making it the third heaviest snowfall in the city's history. Also significant about that week in 2013 was how low temperatures dropped and remained that way for several days with daytime highs failing to reach the freezing mark, and one night time low temperature of 1 °F (−17 °C), recorded at the airport, was the coldest in the city in over 100 years. The rare, prolonged cold spell killed or severely damaged much of the area's sensitive vegetation such as the Mexican/California Fan palm trees.

Wikipedia (CC-BY-SA 3.0)